Why should I care about search engines?

The short answer is, because search engines are the gateway to paying customers.

Aside from the glaring fact that 93% of online experiences begin with a search engine and there are over two billion people online (that’s roughly 40% of the world’s population). The reality is, a majority of your customer base is hanging out online.

More to the point, I’ll answer that question with another question. Have you ever gotten lost in the woods?

Now, if you haven’t, consider yourself lucky. But if you have, you know the only thing in the world you want (aside from a cheeseburger) is to be found.

Picture yourself alone in the woods. Completely alone and lost. When it happens, you start doing everything in your power to make sure someone finds you.

You put on any bright clothing you have.

You waive your arms and shout at anything that even remotely resembles a human being.

You start trying to build a fire to make smoke signals.

You pull out something reflective from your bag to flash at airplanes.

You start building large man-made structures (AKA ducks) to attract attention.

You locate the highest point possible or try to find open space so you can be spotted.

The point is, you fight to be found.

You fight because your very life depends on it.

But it’s only when you’re in that kind of extreme situation that you fight. You’re trying to get someone—anyone’s—attention.

Attention is currency. Especially online.

Now, instead of you alone in the woods picture that it’s your business or your blog that’s trying to be found online. Your one job as a listing on the first page is to grab someone’s attention, hook them on your story, and sell to them.

The search engine results page (SERP) is your wilderness.

Screen Shot 2017-12-01 at 8.34.21 PM.png

search for “what is content marketing.”  What would you click on? 

The simple fact is that search engines process questions posed by real people (who have real money too!). Google processes over 3.5 billion searches every day.

It’s time to realize what it takes to be found online. And the fight is already at your doorstep. Between Google’s Mobile First index initiative and smart, connected devices everywhere, getting found is only the beginning of surviving in the digital age.

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The Secret to Content Marketing: UnMarketing – Q&A from Scott Stratten

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

That’s never been more true for content marketers than it is today. Thankfully, there are unconventional marketers living and speaking (read: ranting) among us to guide the way and keep us honest about what really matters in business and to people. Scott Stratten is one of them.  Scott is the author of “UnMarketing: Everything Has Changed and Nothing is Different.” He is also a dynamic speaker.

I first heard of Scott and his work when I was interviewing a number of speakers from Content Marketing World earlier this year.  I was curious to get his perspective on how he consistently creates quality content. While I wasn’t able to meet Scott in person, he very kindly responded to my interview questions via email.

His answers delighted and informed me. I hope you enjoy his wit and wisdom too:

(HM) What information does your audience most want to read about? And how do you deliver on that?

(SS) We’re pretty unique in that we focus mainly on bad business instead of good. The UnPodcast is “The Business Show For The Fed-Up”. We’ve become the magnet for when a brand does wrong, our army of followers send it to us. You never want to be the name in the message “Did you guys see this?”

We deliver it through our weekly UnPodcast, blog (rarely), 5 books and 60 keynote talks at conferences per year.

(HM) How do you know what to write about? 

(SS) If we find it interesting, then so does our audience. We’ve always put out content we enjoyed, and then the audience qualifies itself.

(HM) How do you say current with industry trends in content marketing?

(SS) Always be consuming. To be a good content marketer, you have to be an insatiable content consumer. I never stop reading/watching/listening. That’s my only job. Strong newsletter subscriptions, Google news alerts and even smarter friends/colleagues/fans that curate great content, both directly to us and in their own feeds.

(HM) What combination of platforms are you using to curate and create content?

(SS) Weekly UnPodcast, blog, 5 books and 60 keynote talks at conferences per year. Post weekly on UnMarketing Facebook page (on average, no set frequency), tweet when we feel like it and wonder weekly why we use LinkedIn.

(HM) What are some of the problems that aren’t being addressed by larger companies in the area of content marketing?

(SS) Content is contextual based on the platform it’s published on. We uploaded a video of one of my rants. It got 250k views, which is great but should have been better. Knowing the context of Facebook video (versus YouTube) that you have to catch a potential viewer in a scroll on their news feeds, we re-uploaded the same clip, with a letterboxed view, complete with an attention grabbing headline that stayed on the video. It received over 14,000,000 views. No changes except the words on it.

(HM) What’s a common question you get asked a lot from your clients relating to content?

(SS) No idea, we have no clients 🙂

(HM) In your opinion, what is the most important element of storytelling?

(SS) There’s a reason most great stories are from humans instead of brands: companies can’t get themselves away from the mirror and realize it’s about the person consuming the story, not the one telling it.

(HM) What is your biggest content related challenge?

(SS) The debate between frequency and quality. We send a newsletter out every 6 months, but we should do it a lot more.

(HM) What does your research process look like when you’re writing about a topic you don’t know anything about?

(SS) Google 🙂

(HM) How do you see content evolving over the next 3-5 years?

(SS) Not much. Most people are predicting we’ll consume everything in VR/AR have a vested interested in it.

Bio

Scott Stratten is the President of UnMarketing. He is an expert in Viral, Social, and Authentic Marketing which he calls UnMarketing. Formerly a music industry marketer, national sales training manager and a Professor at the Sheridan College School of Business, he ran his “UnAgency” for a nearly a decade before solely focusing on speaking at events for companies like PepsiCo, Adobe, Red Cross, Hard Rock Cafe, Cirque du Soleil, Saks Fifth Avenue, Deloitte and Fidelity Investments when they need help guiding their way through the viral/social media and relationship marketing landscape. He now has over 175,000 people follow his daily rantings on Twitter and was named one of the top 5 social media influencers in the world on Forbes.com.

He has written four best-selling business books, the newest being “UnSelling: The New Customer Experience” which was just named “Sales Book of the Year” by 1-800 CEOREAD.

His passion comes out most when speaking on stage, preaching engagement and becoming one of the most sought-out speakers on the subject. Along with Alison Kramer, their UnPodcast has been signed by the CBS network as their premier business podcast to launch their new digital network.

His clients’ viral marketing videos have been viewed over 60 million times and he’s recently appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, USA Today, Entrepreneur Magazine, CNN.com, Inc.com and Fast Company and was named one of “America’s 10 Marketing Gurus” by Business Review USA. That plus $5 gets him a coffee anywhere in the world.


Follow UnMarketing on Facebook  or on Twitter at @unmarketing.

Something you may not know about me is…I began as a magician’s assistant

My very first job out of college (gasp! in 2007) was anything but a typical 9-5. But it’s part of who I am today.

JMP Creative_Holly Miller_ article in CU newspaper.jpg

This is literally a scan of the article clipping from the Chapman Alumni magazine.

To this day, I’m not really sure how I came home and told my parents my first job was going to be a magician’s assistant. Quite literally but not literally. You see, I was the executive assistant to a magician turned business owner whose company, JMP Creative, operated in the toy and promotional product industry.

JMP Creative_Holly Miller blog.png

Yes, you’re reading that Twitter profile correctly, this was all in a workplace that had created a billion toys. All of these rooms were part of the tour and culminated at the world’s most unique conference room…the mother ship.

The underlying meaning of “get the conference room ready” meant my timing had to be exact. I learned to give myself at least 15-20 minutes of run-around prep where I’d swiftly navigate the presentation route throughout the toy room, arcade, Think Tank, artist area, library (I always adored how many books we had) –before sneaking past the tour in progress and deftly sprinting across the parking lot to our adjacent building–where I’d switch off the house lights and turn on (you guessed it) the show lights and soundtrack to the conference room a (life-size?) spaceship suspended upon an iron framework.

JMP Creative_space ship conference room_Holly Miller.pngMeanwhile, back on earth, I learned the true value of hard work.

The ingredient for success is hard work.

My early days were spent among artists, animators and inventors in a 10,000 square foot million dollar workplace of productivity and ideation. I organized numerous display shelves of toys (created by JMP or collected by Jim for inspiration purposes), dusted glowing pinball machines weekly and practically had the corporate credit card on file at the Container Store for all the stackable jars of brightly-colored goop we’d store or ship off to the production factory.

It was really hard work to stay organized myself and to do the same for our CEO. Still, I loved how weird and chaotic the day-to-day operations could be. Seriously, I should have started blogging back then. Every day was unique and challenging in its own way and I just had to jump in and navigate.

Thinking back, I sat in on numerous meetings with Jim where inventors would bring their ideas or contraptions to him seeking product or marketing innovation. It’s where I myself began to tune into my own instincts as a marketer thinking, “what kind of person would likely search for something like this?” and “would they purchase it?”  There was a lot involved from research, iteration, pitching, revising, patenting, tinkering, refining etc, etc.

The lesson I walked away with was: if you want to make something a reality, you have to bring it to life. There is no substitute for hard work.

Sparking creativity: Brainstorming is play-storming 

Remember when you were a kid and a couch fort was anything but a crude pile of pillows and cushions? Your imagination was the key to wherever you wanted to go. We seem to lose this ability as we grow up.

But somehow, Jim had captured lightening in a bottle. His forte was engineering creative brainstorm sessions for adults. During my time there, we hosted a variety of groups from entertainment executives to wealthy foreign entrepreneurs. The sessions were designed around a simple concept: play.  Even our weekly internal meeting (“Monday Fun Day”) was engineered in the same way.

Jim habitually collected toys, props, or anything representing creative imagery.  To him, each was a different kind of tool he hoped might help inspire a client’s big idea. While it was an incredibly fruitful and ingenious technique, organizing this world in which I found myself proved to be a unique challenge.

Eventually, I grew to appreciate my own balance of organized chaos when it came to creativity. Jim was one of my earliest mentors. He was an incredible example to me of the importance of building a personal brand around showmanship (he was a magician, after all). His facility was on par with that feeling of following John Hammond around Jurassic Park, “we spared no expense!”

Jurassic park_Holly Miller blog.png

Whenever I came up against a roadblock, Jim encouraged me to find a different way to solve the problem. Those moments of having to think on my feet in front of him seemed endless. I frequently found it stressful not finding the right answer immediately. Ultimately, nature won and my brain found a new neural pathway to producing results.

Because of this, I became a much more resourceful person. Now I think, “Ok that didn’t work. But there is always a way. What’s the next thing I can try?”

My extraordinary moment – Creating Christmas in July

One of the best projects I got to be a part of was when JMP was approached by a production company to participate in the reality television series American Inventor. Three inventors were selected to work with our company and we were all on different teams to help them build, prove and develop a go to market strategy for their respective inventions. I was part of Team Chavez, with the Guardian Angel product (woo!).

Filming for American Inventor_JMP Creative.JPG

That’s me inching backwards from a mock living room completely engulfed in flames (don’t worry, mom, it was a controlled burn). See, even the professionals are present. How I got to that point requires a bit more context.

Chavez, a firefighter by trade, had an invention where the angel on top of a Christmas tree was specially designed activate and release water by way of a coil system were the tree to catch on fire.

Typically, we would be in development on a toy or product for up to a year. But due to the nature of reality TV and the production schedule, we basically shot around the clock for one month.  The timeline was compressed, to say the least, and we still had to go through all the stages of product development from sketched concept to a finished, market viable product.

On the big shoot day, production teams, JMP crew, and fire fighters set up on the back lot of a local fire station training ground to capture the product in action. We built a three-walled mock living room completely furnished (by yours truly) with curtains, couch, coffee table and, of course, Christmas tree (apparently, I couldn’t be bothered with presents at the time?).

Let’s take this in for a moment, this was July in southern California and I found Christmas trees (it still amazes me that I found a way). It was already incredibly hot outside and there we were trying to light a tree on fire to capture the successful product activation of a fire-suppression system and not enough of anything to be setting on fire. All in a day’s work.

But we delivered.

“JMP set up five cameras to shoot the test from every angle while ABC’s crews videotaped all the action.

The first test, the horn sounded but water didn’t flow because the angel blocked the release mechanism.

The second test put out the fire so fast there was hardly any flame.

Chavez wanted a bigger fire.

“You’re killing me,” McCafferty cried, half joking. They had just one fire sensor and two Christmas trees left.

The third test, a two-foot flame shot up, the horn sounded, water sprayed, the fire was not just suppressed but extinguished.

“It was probably one of the best moments in the whole process,” McCafferty said.
The judges and viewers who voted to determine the winner apparently agreed. Chavez won the million dollars and is in negotiations with First Alert.”
http://www.ocregister.com/2007/08/27/american-inventor-contestants-get-help-from-local-firm/

American Inventor_JMPCreative.JPG

Reality TV show ABC's American Inventor.JPG
I really should have asked for some of the firefighter turnout gear…

From Big Ideas to Big Data

My experience as a magician’s assistant gave me a unique skill set. It taught me how to become more adaptable, resourceful and creative. These days, I work for a German software platform that uses big data insights around business intelligence and the most outlandish place my meetings take me is Berlin.  I no longer have meetings in space ships or have to source Christmas trees in LA in the middle of summer. But my foundation in toy and product development is where I developed a great deal of humility around what it takes to bring an idea to life.

Bring on the rare, the bizarre — I can manage. I do my best work in the unknown because it’s oddly comfortable. Care to join me? It can be fun!

 

I know it all sounds so hard to believe. I guess that’s why seeing is believing. Here’s an old promo video I found on YouTube that highlights the awesome work place that is JMP Creative. Enjoy!

 

What Can Marketers Learn From The Best Heist Movies? A Lot…

Admittedly, I’m a movie buff and one of my favorite genera’s are heist movies. I’m also a big fan of well-executed marketing campaigns. Based on my real-world experience as a modern marketer, I have a few parallels to draw between heist films and creating marketing strategies that work.

The heist film…focuses on the planning, execution, and aftermath of a theft. Versions with dominant or prominent comic elements are often called caper movies. They could be described as the analogues of caper stories in film history.  Wikipedia.org – “what is a heist movie”

Why am I telling you this? It’s not that I want you to become a thief of your customer’s money. But if you want to build a great brand, you will want to consider that you have to (figuratively) steal their hearts and minds.

Think about your favorite heist movie and why you like it. For me, it’s stories like Ocean’s Eleven, Inception, The Italian Job, The Inside Man and The Usual Suspects. Using this list of great heist films as my inspiration, here are the five things marketers can learn from the best heist movies.

1. Plan all the way through to the end

Plan everything. Even if your team or co-workers only see the high level points of your strategy, open up a bottle of red wine one quiet evening and plaaaaaaan. “Failing to plan is planning to fail.” Plan for failure too. What are some of the things that could go wrong with the campaign? Doing so can minimize setbacks along the way.

Tom Hardy, Joseph Gordon-Levitt in Inception (2010)

Eames: You mustn’t be afraid to dream a little bigger, darling. [Pulls out a grenade launcher]

Thinking through how you actually deliver a service to your customers is key. From their search needing a product or service to you fulfilling that need. I like to think about it in the sense of a treasure map. Marketer’s should make it stupid easy for people to find the treasure (i.e. your product). Savvy? Ok, sorry for the Pirates of the Caribbean reference but, planning really involves thinking through the content that’s relevant to the search your users are doing and creating content servicing that need.

2. Everyone has their own unique strengths

Combine them. That’s right, you heard me, combine them. As a marketer, it’s in your best interest to nurture a team leveraging the unique qualities of each person.  This is how you build productive teams. There’s no real process for operating a great team, the secret is letting each individual do what they do well. That’s how you win together.

Ocean's 11 (2001)

Turk Malloy: [intentionally arguing to each other extend the time needed for their balloons to block the security camera’s view] Watch it, bud. Virgil Malloy: Who you calling bud, pal? Turk Malloy: Who you calling pal, friend? Virgil Malloy: Who you calling friend, jackass? Turk Malloy: Don’t call me a jackass. Virgil Malloy: I just did call you a jackass.

3. Look out for one another

Teams are like family; they stick together and have each other’s backs. The lesson here for marketers is that brands that really care and demonstrate they understand their customers will win and retain their customer base much better than the typical “kthanksby” for your purchase experience.

Inside Man (2006)

Keith Frazier: Oh, please, do not say proposals… my girlfriend… she wants a proposal from me. Dalton Russell: You think you’re too young to get married? Keith Frazier: No, I’m not too young… too broke. Maybe I should rob a bank. Dalton Russell: Do you love each other? Keith Frazier: Yeah, yeah, we do. Dalton Russell: Then money shouldn’t really matter. Keith Frazier: Thank you, bank robber!

4. Ringleaders adapt to stay in control of the progression of events

Sometimes things don’t go according to plan (see the above section on planning for failure). And that’s OK. But the reason why we like Dominick Cobb or Danny Ocean is because they seem in control.

As marketers, we know it’s not possible to remain completely in control of the outcome with such a fragmented landscape. We have to contend with things like show-rooming where people try things in store then buy online, or worse yet they snag a discounted Groupon-type engagement with your product or service. Again, that’s why planning comes in handy. Stay in touch with the customer-facing teams, like sales and customer support, so that you can use all of the data input you have to build a story line of what’s happening. Where are your customers buying and how can you (the authentic brand) be there instead to earn the sale?

Inception (2010)

5. The masterminds always gets what they want

Don’t you just want to be that person too!? I mean, how is it that they always get what they want? Because it’s by design.

For modern marketers, this means finding your true customers and continuing to bring value to them. You can also pay it forward; doing the unexpected is…well unexpected. It can even be delightful.

But it’s all by design.

Inception (2010) directed by Christopher Nolen

The Usual Suspects (1995) - Kevin Spacey. Directed by Bryan Singer

Are Enterprise SEO’s a Dying Breed?

Imagine you’re a physician. You’re traveling home on a flight back from a week-long conference where you had to renew your certification. You met many new and old connections and came away knowing your industry is alive and well.  The plane loudly hums along through the air while you review your session notes. Then you begin to hear some commotion from the other passengers a few rows behind you.

One voice. “Can we get her some water?”

Another voice. “She’s having trouble breathing…”

The flight attendant call button sounds in the cabin “ding!” You remain seated. Ears pricked up but waiting.

Your eyes are just returning to your notes when the pilot comes over the loud speaker, “Sorry for the disturbance folks. If there is a doctor on board, please make yourself known to a flight attendant.”

Out of commitment to your field, you are obligated to get involved. Out of personal passion, you have chosen this field. Either way, you are required to help and try to restore that human being back to health. And because of this, people listen to you.

I often feel like I’m a doctor making as many helpful recommendations as I can when it comes to corporate SEO initiatives. But there are so many different parties involved; it can be hard to meet everyone’s needs equally – time involved, level of effort, impact on improving organic traffic, all while staying on top of industry fluctuations. For such improvements to make an impact site-wide, it takes a village.

My parents are both in the medical field. When I was young, I was actually dissuaded from becoming a doctor. But I still have this inherent desire to help and to fix things.

When I hear digital challenges like “why did organic traffic drop on this date,” or “why are these pages not converting” I like the investigation. I thrive on it.  I look at the symptoms the website or a page is exhibiting and I try to gauge that against what I know of Google’s standard for user experience and content that’s relevant to the intent behind the search query.

But I have to be careful not to go too deep down the rabbit hole on what factors might be the cause of the issue. Today, the algorithms are working in real time and we can never be fully confident in the knowledge that a single factor is the cause.

Which is why, we as SEO’s make recommendations to the best of our knowledge, we test and we watch. If the patient (website) improves, we know we addressed the right aspect of the problem. This is why SEO is a long term game. There are no shortcuts to quality. It’s an investment in the right things making sure you empower other teams to help you along the way.

“There is a new breed of SEO manager who is politically savvy and gifted at collaborating with and mobilizing non-SEO teams. If SEO-integration isn’t on your roadmap, you’d better hope it’s not on your competitors’ maps either–otherwise they’ll have gold, and you won’t.”  The Executive SEO Playbook, by Jessica Bowman

Why do doctors never give up? Because they care. And it might also have something to do with taking a Hippocratic Oath 😉

How can enterprise-level SEO’s be as effective? My prescription is the following:

  1. Have more productive SEO-based conversations with stakeholders.
  2. Make SEO easy to implement and actionable for each team.
  3. Foster connections with other trusted, in-house SEO’s and seek their advice regularly.
  4. Read Jessica’s book!

 

How I’m learning to get over my fear of failure

holly miller athlete.jpg

Let me give you steps of a completely different kind because there is no checklist to getting over your fears; there are no shortcuts here. For what it’s worth, I’m learning it has more to do with leveraging a balance of mental and physical strength. Getting into a routine that helps you build physical strength and mobility is undoubtedly going to do wonders for your confidence, body, health etc. But in addition to that, there’s the “health” and strength of your mind – specifically your thoughts.

The mental work will be largely based on personal preference, but here are some good places, I’ve found, to start:
1.  “Practice Focus” Episode 5 – Living with Courage podcast.
2. “Emotional Agility: Get Unstuck, Embrace Change, and Thrive in Work and Life” by Susan David, PhD.

It’s normal (evolutionary, even) for us to feel fear. But what holds us back is the fact that we can cling to fear and accept it as reality. For weightlifting, it can be a thought like, “the weight that’s on the bar is heavy. I can’t do it.”

Now, I’m not going to step up to attempt a lift on a loaded bar of weight I’ve never lifted before because that’s not a good idea; you need to be training and building up to the weight (listen to the podcast). But, there is a way to create a new mental pathway that can help in your practice. It comes from “distancing [yourself] from both the physical effects of [your] fear–the cortisol surge, the accelerated heart rate, and the hyperventilation–and from any self-doubting narratives that might have already hooked [you]…” Learning to acknowledge yet distance yourself from your emotions and connecting with why you actually want to do something is how you learn to go forward in spite of the fears that are holding you back.

It may not be okay right then and there. But it will be okay.

You can lift the weights. You can engage in the difficult conversations with your significant other. You can speak up in a company meeting. You can do these things with your fear and the internal self doubt and still go forward.

It’s not about being fearless but having the courage to go forward with both your fears and your values on board because it’s intrinsically important to you.

Speculations on ‘Spectre’: Bond Girls Should Bring It Too

I recently saw the latest Bond installment, ‘Spectre’…and I’m a bit conflicted on how I feel about the move–especially the ending. (Fair warning for those who have yet to see it, this post is both a movie spoiler and a bit of a rant on how this Bond girl should have been portrayed).  I feel like there were conflicting thematic endings. One where we acknowledge the fact that the M16 agent program is better off using humans (not high tech machines) who are better equipped at calculating and weighing the factors of whether to kill or not to kill. The other where Bond goes against his character in favor of what looks like personal pursuits.

I felt Bond was not being true to the Bond character in the final moments of the film when he’s standing over the villain, Oberhauser, who taunts, “finish it.” And he doesn’t do it. He doesn’t finish off the villain (seriously!? that’s a top action movie rule: always finish the job). Unless there’s a squeal. Then you let the bad guy live.

So James Bond doesn’t finish the job. Instead Bond says “I’m all out of bullets. And…” glancing at the beautiful blonde nearby, “I’ve got better things to do.” It doesn’t make sense! Was his decision more to do with the humanistic aspect of being an assassin and choosing not to kill or the fact that Bond now had legitimate romantic aspirations? I found myself thinking this is maddening and uncharacteristic.

I suppose too that since this was the last installment of this particular Bond franchise, the writer/director would be looking to essentially package things up for the audience. While I agree having Bond shoot Oberhauser in the head would be pretty brutal (even for this film), sometimes, the good guys have to do bad things to make the bad guys pay (seriously, that scene with the small drill had me on the edge of my seat!).  If it were up to me, I would have ended the movie this way:

Oberhauser
Finish it.

Bond
Have it your way. (shoots him)
(But we keep the camera on Bond, see him fire and hear a loud BANG)

M
James, you didn’t have to kill him…

Bond
Yes, I did. Because now I’m all out of bullets and I have better things to do.

I’m all for Bond choosing the girl over the gun, but I didn’t like how the writing made it seem like he was choosing between being who he is and who he wants to be.   His love interest Madeleine Swann even walks away from him at one point saying she can’t be with him because, “…it’s who you are.” Clearly, Swann recognizes he’s not the type of man for her because maybe his lifestyle as an assassin is not something she wants to become involved in (good job, sweetheart!).

When she walked away I thought, “OK, good. She respects him enough to walk away so that he can get on with being a bad ass assassin.”  But I fond myself frustrated minutes later after the climactic scene where Bond saves her, that they end up together.  She didn’t stick to her standard and neither did he–especially tossing his gun into the river.

What?! He tosses his gun away just like that and strides over to take her in his arms?

I don’t feel Bond should have gone against his character in order to be with the woman he (supposedly now) loves.  (His only real choice out of all the Bond girls before should have been taking care not to end up with a crazy one). In my opinion, if this Bond girl were really right for James, she would appreciate him for the cunning (and handsome) assassin that he is and support him in being that.

Which is why I wish this Bond girl had more to offer.  This leading lady is apparently a psychologist working at a private medical clinic in the Austrian Alps (with an amazing office that has an incredible view). Ironically, Swann is the daughter of an assassin (Bond’s old nemesis Mr White) which means she gets him in a way most women do not.  But the chemistry only spiked after the action sequences and Swann didn’t fit the bill for the type of “partner in crime” that would actually compliment someone like Bond.  Her psychology prowess never actually lent itself to the story line, she was afraid to handle a gun (yet she knew her way around one), and she got stuck with random one-liners like “what shall we do now?” followed by a smash cut to Bond and Swann making out.

I just wish her character had been written as more complimentary to that of James Bond. Thankfully, though, she nailed it bringing her own sense of swagger in the gowns she appeared in.

Spectre movie review

LOVER Lace Dress in new James Bond film ‘Spectre’ seen on bond girl Lea Seydoux

Once I have an extra $600.00 I’ll be sure to pick up this little number on eBay.

In spite of the ending, ‘Spectre’ is still a great ride and everything you’d expect from a flashy Bond film. Maybe Bond girls aren’t meant to be bad-asses like James Bond himself. I suppose I’ll just have to wait for a heroine when the Hunger Games Mockingjay part 2 is due out later this month.

More on the film’s gadgets, guns and gowns highlighted in this Bloomberg Business article.