The Busy Marketer’s Guide to Google’s Broad Core Algorithm Update of 8/1

Are you sitting down?

Good. Because Google just announced they made an algorithm update on August 1, 2018. They rarely confirm any kind of update let alone one having to do with their algorithm.

Still, the August announcement was made via the Twitter account from Google Search Liaison (@searchliaison).

Here is the tweet:

Google SearchLiaison on Twitter

Google SearchLiaison @searchliaison

When did the algorithm update happen?

Here’s what makes this Broad Core (BC) algorithm update special, 8/1 is the third iteration of a broad core update that’s been announced this year. Which means Google is actively communicating to webmasters about algorithm improvements.

Here’s a quick overview of the timeline from SEO industry heavyweights:

Per the Tweet above, these types of updates are done “routinely several times per year.”

More threads on Twitter expanded upon Google’s explanation around the latest 8/1 release:

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This part of the Tweet is interesting to note, “There is nothing wrong with pages that may now perform less well. Instead, it’s that changes to our systems are benefitting pages that were previously under-rewarded…”

Marketers & SEO’s shouldn’t jump to make changes to pages that may have slipped in rankings. It might be prudent to check pages that were ranking in striking distance position to page 1 (positions 11-20) to see if those pages are now ranking higher.

The speculation continued last week all the while the BC algorithm continues to roll out into the second week of August.

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What is the Broad Core Update?

So there’s “no fix” only, get better. In my opinion, the takeaway around the BC algorithm is that it is related to the types of quality updates seen with Panda (maybe even to an extent Phantom) where pages with thin content did not rank well.

It seems like a re-evaluation of pages that have good content but have been underperforming. Meeting user intent (or relevancy) is a factor. Maybe searchers have been returning to the SERPS and clicking on what they feel to be better, more relevant results, further down the page?

All in all, Google wants to provide the best results to the searcher and better understanding the human intent behind the query or keyword search helps them refine their listings.

It would seem this BC update relates to Google’s core algorithm.

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The takeaway: “This is a broader general change to the core algorithm.”

What does Google want at its core? Quality. It wants to provide the best individual user experience possible to the person asking a question or typing in a noun into their search box.

Marie Haynes, a recognized industry authority figure on algorithms, shared a few insights from here client’s data and clues about potentially affected industries:

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What industries were affected? 

Furthermore, Haynes’ data indicated the 8/1 update strongly affected sites dealing with diet products, nutrition and medical products otherwise known as YMYL (Your Money Or Your Life) sites.

  • “It is important to note that most sites that I monitor did not see any significant changes. However, the majority of those that did see changes were very strongly affected” Haynes said.
  • In her opinion, the update is primarily about trust. Many sites that were hit were sites that lacked author E-A-T, lacked reputation information, or were selling products that could be deemed untrustworthy.

I happen to agree with her completely, especially on the point of sites needing to invest in content that reflects Expertise, Authority, and Trustworthiness.

Large service based businesses have been known to publish lots of pages that probably have little value (or content) on them simply because at one point, everyone thought more content translated into better rankings. But it doesn’t. It marginally increases the potential to have more pages ranking because you have a higher volume of pages in Google’s index. It doesn’t mean the content is of high quality.

Assuming this BC update is based on course correcting where Google is looking for more quality signals, it does not mean webmasters need more pages; it means they need to improve upon the pages that already exist.

Another trusted resource of the SEO community is Glenn Gabe. He has compiled two extensive blog posts detailing his data and the insights he is seeing thus far from this update. Here are a few of his highlights; clues to quality and relevance factors:

Gabe’s Clues:

  • March was a global update impacting domains across categories and countries.
  • The impact was site-wide rather than at the page level.
  • “In January of 2016, we found out that Panda became part of Google’s core ranking algorithm… Panda seemed to focus more on relevance rather than hammering sites that were low-quality.”
  • The March and April updates were big. Relevance AND quality stood out.
  • Make fixes and don’t roll them back. “Google’s John Mueller has explained several times that Google wants to see significant improvement over the long-term.”

Simply put, Relevance and Quality are the keys to these broad updates happening throughout this year. It’s very possible these two factors will continue to be at the forefront of future BC updates.

What should we do?

First things first 😉

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Now that we know there’s no quick fix (hint: there never really is). Marketers & SEO’s alike should “focus on building great content.” Here’s my caveat: remain focused on building great content by improving upon what you have and provide a great website experience for users and bots that’s technically sound. If we do that, we’ll weather the upcoming iterations of Google’s broad core algorithm updates.

Reversals in organic traffic can happen (meaning your traffic dips for a time then comes back up) but webmasters should not simply wait around and do nothing. This is an opportunity to improve the elements on our web domain that are within our control. Here are the top recommendations and action steps I compiled from Gabe and Haynes:

  1. Improve your website: add useful & helpful content, address any technical SEO issues, improve the user experience, cut down on pop-up ads and boxes “join-our-newsletter requests” that obstruct the visitor from seeing your content.
  2. Don’t revert changes – Keep the fixes in place for at least several months.
  3. Analyze queries and content that lost rankings – Check the queries the page was ranking for, evaluate the on-page content with an objective eye to see if the page is relevant to the search intent.
  4. Perform real user testing – Invest in asking a handful of people to navigate your site with a goal in mind. Have them narrate the experience, record it, and make changes based on the findings. A fresh pair of eyes can help you see where to make improvements.
  5. Read the QRT – Quality Rater Guidelines and have working review sections with your team. You can download the PDF of the general guidelines updated in July.
  6. Use the GSC Index Coverage Report – This is a newer section of Search Console that helps webmasters understand which pages Google is indexing and which pages it’s not. Gabe recommends keeping a close eye on the “Excluded,” reporting. That’s where you can often find serious problems. It contains pages that Google has crawled, but decided NOT to index for some reason.
    1. GSC Location: Status>>Index Coverage>>Excluded

Continue to monitor rankings for organic search traffic (especially on mobile!) from mid July through mid August since the update is still presumed to be rolling out this week.

Could your content and website use help identifying technical SEO improvements and specific quality and content areas to address during this update?

Contact me for an SEO Site Audit by emailing me at itsmillertime0baby (at) gmail.com. Subject line: SEO Site Audit – BC Update.

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These are a few of my favorite things about Content Marketing

I get lots of questions about content marketing and how it can be improved using SEO (Search Engine Optimization). I thought I would take a moment to capture the advice I give for the questions I get asked most often on this topic.

Since there are a lot of questions that are tangentially related, I broke this post up into three main sections:

  1. Process & Strategy: Structure, Style, Tone and Keyword Research
  2. Measurement: Success Metrics, Performance Reports, Quality
  3. The million dollar question – How does Google rank content?

Grab a cup of hot chocolate, Holly’s advice starts now. 🙂

 

Process & Strategy: Structure, Style, Tone and Keyword Research

Q: How do you determine the style and tone of voice for a piece of content?

Q: Which tone or style have you seen to be most successful in past projects?

It might sound obvious but a conversational style and tone where correct grammar and punctuation are used (obviously) without sounding like a robot or where the author is writing just to obtain search engine rankings really does resonate with human beings.

In terms of what’s most effective, I’ve found educational, helpful content that solves the user’s problem is the best approach.

It takes a bit of testing and iterating but after researching what people search for that’s related to a the main topic (i.e. “weight loss” or “home entertainment system”),  answering the questions that are being asked is the most effective way to provide useful, relevant and informative content.

Solve real problems. Build trust. Sales will ensue.

Q: How do you decide which content topics to focus on and what format that content should take?

Since I always advocate a customer-focused approach, the smartest thing to do is to start by listening to what consumers in your market want. You do this by getting an understanding of the kinds of content that’s already ranking in Google when you search for your core topic. According to Google, that’s what consumers want to see.

The other variables that help you decide what to focus on are: keyword seasonality, average monthly search volume. You want to align these to your business priorities in terms of the resources you have to optimize existing content versus spending all your time creating new content. It’s faster and easier to improve upon content you already have.

For format, think about how you can make your branded content the most relevant to what consumers are seeking (this is called matching search intent). Does that mean providing a video? Maybe listing steps in a guide? This takes research and examination of the landscape digesting what’s ranking and using that information to improve your contributions.

More on format, it’s helpful to bucket content into two main types so the intent of your pages is clear:

  1. Informational (educational in nature and intent)
  2.  Transactional (which is more product focused)

In this way, your page is designed to either capture rankings for organic searches (i.e. “best queen mattresses”) when consumers are in an awareness and consideration stage. Or it could be to gain rankings for product pages focused on transaction-based searches (i.e. brand+mattress: “Serta mattress”).

Many brands try to create content that gives shopping tips & ideas.  Start by performing keyword research to see the data that’s available on a term especially the estimated monthly search volume. If you pay for an enterprise SEO tool, you can easily get this type of data. Alternatively, one of the best “free” tools available is to sign up for a Google Adwords account. This will require you to enter some form of credit card information but you don’t have to buy ads; you’re there to do research. Just be aware that your cc info is on file.

Some enterprise tools also show Seasonality data (i.e for a fluid term like “flowers” it’s at its peek in January/February due to the Valentines day holiday). This is helpful to know because it indicates the time of year of when your content is going to be the most relevant to someone searching for it online.

It also indicates when teams should begin refreshing content for upcoming seasonally relevant searches. Especially helpful if you manage an internal content team or external writers as part of your content resource.

Here are a few quick ideas of the places I check when I’m researching the landscape and brainstorming the kind of content that will be most effective.  The process involves researching metrics using several free & paid tools:

  • Identify missing topics and search intent using tools like AnswerThePublic.com and Moz Insights.
  • Check the Google SERP to see what questions appear in People Also Ask boxes.
  • Identify the first 20 short head terms related to the topic which have a significant search volume (no lower than 1K) and a second list of another 20 terms which are long tail terms. Prioritize these as tier 1 and 2.
  • Check Buzzsumo for trending topics related to the category page for opportunities to provide content competitors are not covering.

Ideally, your research and methodology needs a combination of qualitative and quantitative data. You’ll be manually evaluating the quality of your competitor’s content and using data to improve your own pages.

Q: What is a good process for proofreading?

Q: Can you describe a process for creating and updating style and copy guidelines?

My process is largely based on ensuring the content meets the user’s intent and provides value: it solves a problem with information or provides a solution that solves the problem a human is experiencing.  Bottom line, if the content is not useful the searcher will go elsewhere. There is so much “noise” online so the most effective content must deliver value.

A good process for creating or updating style and copy guidelines is similar to a gap analysis (what’s missing from our competitor pages that you can talk about) is to reference the Google Quality Rater Guidelines. Google began publishing this information in 2013 so that more webmasters would have a blueprint for what Google considers to be quality. One of the key elements is a component called E-A-T. Online content should demonstrate Expertise, Authority, and Trustworthiness.  It’s worth downloading a copy of the PDF and looking through it on a Sunday afternoon building the insights into your style guide to share with broader teams and writers.

Q: How would you structure a content calendar to compete with a brand’s main vertical competitors?

Q: What is the process of a competitive analysis to identify gaps and content opportunities?

Broadly speaking, every business has three main types of competitors that they compete with for consumer attention. It’s helpful to think of classifying these as:

  • direct
  • indirect
  • informational

Here is a framework for you so you can begin to group the brand names and think about a mini business SWOT analysis against your main vertical competitors:

Direct Competitors Indirect Competitors Informational Competitors
(physical retailers who offer similar products to your store’s main categories) (vertical retailers who sell similar categories your brand also sells, some may be online-only) (these are websites that publish content from a non-retail source on how to buy things your brand sells)
brand name 1

brand name 2

brand name 1…etc. brand name 1… etc.

The process for structuring a content calendar to compete with your brand’s vertical competitors takes time. Quite honestly, it’s a topic for another post. At a high level, though, it starts with research to establish a baseline of these components:

  • keyword topics
  • a gap analysis of competitor pages on a URL-to-URL level basis to determine the type of content that will be most effective against competitive pages and holds value to searchers.
  • prioritizing internal and external resources and identifying where your brand wants to invest in building out value-based content that inspires customers.
  • determine baseline performance KPIs you want to see from the published content. This will inform where and how you make future optimizations on underperforming pages.
  • building measurement dashboards using a combination of KPIs that account for user engagement and rankings.

The key to this strategy is to prioritize improving existing content so that it delivers a ton of value instead of pumping out a bunch of new content that first has to get crawled and indexed and might not give enough value. An editorial calendar designed around quality and location based searches is a unique advantage against competitors that think the answer is quantity and volume.

Onto the second question of addressing the process of a competitive analysis to identify gaps and content opportunities.  In a nutshell, here are the high level components:

  • identify your main topic keywords; the pillar content your site wants to rank for.
  • include several long tail search terms
  • assess the search intent by analyzing the top 10 organic results (5 if you have less time): are people seeking guides? how to pages? Are tips and lists surfacing most? The goal is to get a sense for the format that people want to consume content.
  • manually access how difficult it would be to rank via on page factors; what content does your page need to outperform the one that’s ranking?

I will say this, trying to rank for high search volume terms (i.e. 20K+) is largely a waste of time. For most brands, it’s better to adopt a keyword strategy that lets you create content around core terms, long tail searches that drive specific intent, and questions your brand can answer succinctly (hint: b/c Featured Snippets & Answer Boxes are as good as Position 1 of a paid search ad but you obtain them organically – $free.99, people).

 

Measurement: Success Metrics, Performance Reports, Quality

Strap in. These are some of the more hard-to-define questions.

Q: What makes content/copy “successful”?

Q: How do you know if content has performed well or not?

Q: What are the types of measurement for success analytics?

It depends 🙂

Content success metrics can be defined in many different ways. That’s the good news. The bad news is, there are many metrics to choose from.

Like any goal, the best ones clearly define when success has been achieved. They’re SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Time-bound.

Content is successful it’s when measured against the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) you develop as your guideposts for what you want the content to achieve based on what’s important to your business and within a designated timeframe. For e-commerce sites especially, this is a balance of improving on-page content to generate revenue and improving organic rankings.

Simply put, that could mean “these 20 product pages that receive the most organic traffic in a given month will be successful if 3 out of 5 visitors makes a transaction.” Or, “these four category pages that each have a total of 10 non-brand keywords will ideally rank for upwards of 200 terms after we make the on-page optimizations over these next four weeks.”

See how the SMART framework gives a bit more definition to the term “successful” by making things measurable?

Here’s a small framework for thinking about and identifying qualitative, vanity metrics and quantitative, data-driven ones. Aim to have three total using a combination of these two types:

Vanity Metrics SEO Metrics
(These are more indicators of quality but are hard to measure b/c they don’t directly translate to contributing to a goal like sales) (These are data points are quantifiable b/c they have a number)
  • Positive or negative sentiment in blog or social comments
  • Content is so good it earns a ranking as a Direct Answer box or Featured Snippet.
  • New users acquired to the brand’s social media accounts after the content was published or revamped.
  • Engagement on Social:
    • Likes or other emoji faces
    • Re-tweets
    • Shares across social platforms
  • Mentions and backlinks from a reputable source that are generating X amount of referral traffic to the page.
  • Improving page rank (getting it onto page 1 or within striking distance of moving onto the 1st page)
  • Increasing the number of organic keywords ranking on the page. Think non-brand, generic search terms that a human being would type into Google.
  • Number of page 1 ranking URLs your brand has compared to competitors.

I know, it’s a lot. It’s helpful to determine your success metrics using a balance of qualitative input and quantitative data.

Q: After you have published your content, how would you promote it?

One of my favorite examples is from GaryVee: How to Grow and Distribute Your Brand’s Social Media Content.  It’s is a reverse pyramid where one piece of long form “pillar content” (like a video, infographic, powerful keynote or interview) is created and then repurposed by social teams into smaller pieces of content and distributed across the primary social media platforms: Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, and Quora in a way that’s contextually relevant to users on each platform.

Seriously, re-read that last part. Contextually relevant is key to getting attention and engagement in social. No one wants to see the same message across all their platforms, that’s when your brand starts to get tuned out because your message looks like a mass media advertisement.

It’s important to continually test and evaluate which pieces of short-form content are resonating best on each of the platforms. Story features are different from IG to IGTV to FB. Keep testing in order to get the best headline that resonates with your audience.

The Million Dollar Question – How Does Google Rank Content?

Q: How does Google rank content?

Without a doubt, that is the million-dollar question.

Google has upwards of 200+ ranking factors that it uses to evaluate which 8-10 organic links get to appear on page 1. If everyone knew how Google ranked content, they’d be doing it. That’s why we have to stay curious and be aware of the clues in the data we have and structure of the SERPs.

The search engine giant doesn’t make a habit of announcing when and how it updates its algorithm but when it does, it’s usually around improving the quality of content in order to continue providing the best user experience.

There are specific content guidelines published in the Quality Rater Guidelines. Google is especially critical of websites whose business is to help people make decisions that impact their health and finances; Your-Money-or-Your-Life content (YMYL). It’s also scrutinizing what constitutes “quality” where websites are a known online authority for having topic Expertise, Authority and Trustworthiness (E-A-T) in their field.

Now, quality is even harder to measure than “successful content” because there are many factors involved. But if you’re like me and always looking for some kind of baseline, I have heard other SEO’s comment that it’s measured in links and mentions. Basically, what other authoritative websites say about your brand.

Q: What are Google’s primary algorithms relevant to content/copy writing?

Q: What doesn’t Google like in regard to content? What types of bad content practices could lead to removal or suppression in search results?

Q: Alternatively, what does Google like in content/copy, which makes it rank well in search results? What are a couple of best practices for excellent SEO and optimization for users?

Q: What tools are used for finding keywords, content opportunities and topic analysis to enhance SEO?

There are a few things to unpack here. The primary algorithms related to content are Panda and I would also name the more recent the quality updates in March, April and August (confirmed by Google) as part of their broad core update. Seems Google was busy in 2018.

Google’s Panda update was first released in February 2011. The change targeted “low-quality sites” or “sites with thin content” pushing them farther down in search results page. In particular, “content farms” lost rankings and higher-quality sites became visible near the top of the search results.

Second to making money, Google’s goal is to provide the best user experience. Pages that rank on page 1 are there because they’re considered to be relevant to the query and meet the user’s search intent.

Google does not reward pages with content that misleads users. This is what’s known as “black hat” tactics that are designed to lure people to your website. These are some of the bad tactics that lead to getting a manual penalty from Google:

  • publishing malicious, offensive or inappropriate content
  • phishing scams
  • having too many advertisements on the page
  • having intrusive pop-ups that cover the main content and are especially annoying on smaller, mobile screens
  • thin or low quality content
  • keyword stuffing on pages

This can all be avoided by creating high quality sites in line with demonstrating Expertise, Authority and Trustworthiness relevant to the industry you’re in. Karma exists online too, folks. Do right by each other.

What other kinds of content does Google like to rank?  Images! In fact, according to a recent study by Spark Toro, “Google Images accounts for more than 20% of all queries American performed in 2018.” Demand for images in the SERP is huge and that’s where Google is putting them (instead of under the “Images” tab).

Lastly, in regard to tools, there are some great enterprise SEO tools on the market. The big three are BrightEdge, Conductor and Searchmetrics. Other paid tools I use regularly for topic analysis and data on search volumes are Buzzsumo, SEMRush, Moz, STAT Analytics.  I also love referencing free the website Answerthepublic.com to get a sense of how questions are being asked.

Don’t forget, the Google SERP itself is a fantastic place to identify trending content and opportunities: People Also Ask (PAA) boxes, Related Searches, and predictive searches all provide a great resource for writing content based on what. people. search. for.

The bots are going to think I’m keyword stuffing, I say it so much 😉

Q: What are some good ways to get other people to link to your content?

It sounds really simple but the key is to invest the time to make YOUR content great and worthy of being shared. Great content is memorable, helpful, insightful, inspiring, funny – it resonates with your audience. It can be hard to quantify but if you research the questions people are asking and see what information competitors are putting out there, you can fill the content gap with your content that’s better than anything else out there.

The second side of this coin are the tactics you deploy to promote your great content. This is a combination of leveraging off-site channels like as micro influencers on social media, drumming up authentic PR, and creating email marketing campaigns.

Last tip: Make sure your most fabulous content lives on your domain (.com); there’s nothing worse than driving traffic and eyeballs to a place that’s not owned and managed by your brand.

Q: Can you briefly describe best practices for internal linking and benefits for SEO?

Links are votes of confidence on the web. Internal links help visitors find content that’s related to the reason why they’re reading your blog or browsing your site.

Best practices for internal linking gets into taxonomy and site hierarchy.  A few top level things to include are:

  • submitting XML and HTML sitemaps to GSC so crawlers have a roadmap of all your site pages
  • evaluating and creating unique anchor text enhances the link value
  • running crawls on the site to evaluate which pages are strongest and should therefore link out to other internal “weaker” pages.

The benefit of having a clean, internal linking structure is an SEO benefit in two ways. Firstly, it helps search engines to crawl and index the most important pages of your website (very important when you have thousands of pages). Secondly, it contributes to a good user experience because it means humans can easily navigate your site finding and consuming content they’re interested in.

In conclusion, I now need more hot chocolate.

If you’re still reading, I love you. You deserve a cookie. Definitely a good stretch after consuming so much (great!) content. 🙂

Now it’s over to you: What did I miss? What is your $0.02 and feedback for me? How would you answer these questions differently? What was helpful or sparked some ideas for how you’re navigating SEO and content production?

Comment below and let me know.

 

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Diagnosing A Drop In Traffic: 6 Data Sources to Check & Why

It’s a common scenario for an SEO Manager. You come into the office one morning, open up your SEO dashboards and notice a large drop in traffic to a core product page for your main software product.  It seemed to happen almost over night.

How do you go about diagnosing the issue?

What are some possible hypotheses for what could have caused the drop?

Before we get too far into the details. Let’s get some context. You do SEO for an enterprise software company that has a suite of products for developers and content managers. Your company services over 130,000 customers worldwide.  There are teams similar to yours all over the world in your primary market (English speaking) countries, i.e., Canada, Germany and Australia.

The US market represents the largest of your target markets and the .com site is ideally the one you want ranking in search engines. The size of the website on the same level as the IBM, Microsoft and Salesforce’s of the SaaS world. 

You’re an experienced SEO, and after some digging, you realize that several teams in different countries have published content that is stealing traffic away from the core US product page and this practice could also impact the rankings and performance of other products in the future.

What do you need to do to course correct with cross functional teams?

How do you go about educating teams on how to avoid this kind of issue in the future?

There is a lot to think about here. And you’ve only just finished your first cup of coffee.

Where to start looking  

First things first, diagnosing a drop in traffic means looking at a handful of data sources and formulating a hypothesis. Here are 6 areas where SEO’s should begin looking for clues, what to look for and why it’s relevant to SEO: 

  1. Google Analytics
    • Look for: Which type of traffic declined: organic, direct or referral? Did other, similar pages on the site loose rankings within this same timeframe or is this an isolated incident? 
    • SEO relevance: Knowing which type of traffic source has declined means you’ll be able to back track to the source of the issue. A decline in Referral traffic, for example, may mean some links have been broken on referral websites. A decline in Organic traffic is harder to diagnose but it largely means the source is less visibility of URLs in the SERP. 
  2. Google Search Console 
    • Look for:  Changes to the page in the Performance section. Look at data on Pages, Position, and Search Appearance. Are there any new warnings for this page that Google is flagging for you?
    • SEO relevance: This is largely where webmasters can  “communicate” with Google about their website performance so making sure primary elements like an HTML Sitemap are still visible and up to date are important to double check. 
  3. Development teams & Robots.txt
    • Look for: Ask internal dev teams when the page was last updated or scheduled to be updated (whether that’s tracking pixels, HTML code or on-page content). What was the last team that made updates to the page? Additionally, speak with the dev team leads to confirm nothing changed with the Robots.txt.
    • SEO relevance: Webmasters use the Robots.txt command to communicate crawl instructions to web robots. Bots are either allowed or disallowed from crawling the various folders of the site.  If the page accidentally were disallowed from being crawled, that’s a factor that would impact its rankings.   
  4. Enterprise SEO software tools (Searchmetrics, Conductor, BrightEdge)
    • Look for: Indications of other URLs that have begun ranking for the same term(s) that were previously ranking on your page that lost rankings. Areas like: 
    • Winner/Loser Keywords: what terms were ranking on the page before and after it lost rankings? It could be that a new, better page is in the index that Google is favoring.
    • Overall Content Relevance (E-A-T):  Some tools can measure how relevant the content is against multiple, similar pages in Google’s index. If there were any on-page content changes made recently, it’s worth investigating since it’s possible the changes were ultimately not helpful to users and the page is now underperforming. 
    • URL Rankings: Are there similar pages on the website (even other versions by country) that are cannibalizing rankings of this page? This happens frequently with large, enterprise sites. 
    • Crawl data & log files: Run a crawl to get an idea of what Google is seeing (or not seeing) on the page. Inspect log files for additional insights if available.  Also, check the backlink profile of the page. It’s possible the URL is suffering from spam and/or malicious backlinks dragging down page authority. 
  5. Competitor site performance
    • Look for: Have similar pages on your competitor sites lost rankings too? It could mean aspects of an algorithm update are affecting your industry vertical or that Google decided the page was no longer relevant for certain search queries. 
    • SEO relevance: The search intent of users changes over time. That’s why it’s important to update content to be relevant to the nature of what people are searching for and to continue improving upon existing content.  
  6. Search Engine Results Page (SERP)
    • Look for: Do a manual check to see if there new features in the mobile and/or desktop SERP (whichever device you care about getting traffic from). New elements like a carousel, more images can cause organic listings to be pushed further down the first page. 
    • SEO relevance: Simply put, Google is always looking to surface results that are based on what users want; “Google Images accounts for more than 20% of all queries Americans performed in 2018, and that’s down from a high of nearly 30% three years ago.” Research from SparkToro on 2018 search market share.

Hypothesis – Why the drop happened 

What are some possible hypothesis for the drop in traffic? 

On the whole, there are basically two sources where rankings are affected: internal and external. 

Some of the most common reasons drops in organic traffic occur are the result of external changes such as an algorithm update or the SERP landscape changing (i.e images are prioritized).  Competitor pages can steal rankings if they begin occupying better (higher) positions on the first page. Lastly, a page or site can drop if Google suspects questionable ways of gaining rankings (black or gray hat SEO tactics) are being used (this is called a Manual Penalty).

Conversely, rankings can be affected by internal factors like manual changes made to the page by different product, development or content teams. Internal page cannibalization can occur where other, existing web pages within the same domain outperform the page you want to be ranking. 

Both internal and external factors should be considered and evaluated in order to identify the source and best solution.

It’s common for enterprise level organizations to have many teams interacting with the website at any given time. Which is why it’s important for SEO leads to have open lines of communication and relationships with all teams to quickly address any imbalances.

How to prevent future drops in traffic

In this scenario, the drop was caused by internal teams where different country pages were cannibalizing rankings of the US .com page.  

How can an SEO lead go about educating cross functional, global, teams in the future to avoid this issue?

One approach is for those in SEO leadership roles to would work with internal team leads on creating an outline as a shared resource document that is referenced (almost like a checklist) by various product, content, design etc. teams when updating and publishing important core pages. The reference sheet should include any important, on-page elements that contribute to rankings and list technical SEO requirements that need to be adhered to. Things like:

  • KWs & Relevant content: listing the primary and secondary keywords/ topics for core pages which contribute to rankings. Identify region-specific content or questions that should be addressed so that the page is relevant to local searches and therefore not competitive with other URLs.
  • Technical SEO: In this case, hreflang tags should be applied to each regional page to distinguish the content meant for each region. 

It’s an ongoing combination of maintaining SEO guideline documents in a shared location, using dashboards to monitor ranking fluctuations, and educating the broader internal organization on SEO best practices to help them become more aware of the things that negatively impact rankings. 

Now, it’s back to scanning the horizon for Pandas and Penguins. 

Over to you, fellow SEOs!

Have you had to navigate a similar experience in your org? What other data sets have you used that helped you diagnose and resolve a traffic loss issue? Or, what did I miss in my list that can be added here?  Let me know by commenting below. 

The Reality of Freelancing: The Dream Is Free. The Hustle, Sold Separately

I used to dream about what it would be like to be a digital nomad. Just me, my laptop and a turquoise stretch of ocean on either side.

I’d think about what it would be like to work from a remote location that inspired my creativity and not just a desk where I’m accounted for between 9-5. How much more I could be getting done!

I thought the flexibility of a freelance lifestyle would allow me the time I needed to further build my personal brand and get noticed by brands and influencers. With more time I could make it happen faster!

I’d fantasize about how many projects I could take on. Going from a set income level to being able to charge for projects or hourly work (cha-ching, amiright?!). Which meant that in no time, all the projects I’d be getting paid to do would totally outweigh my full time salary.

Every aspect of freelance work was attractive to me – freedom to take time off when I wanted to, to travel, to get to the gym more, to not have a commute to/from an office, to cook all my own meals, to work from home wearing comfy clothes and also be productive at life tossing in a quick load of laundry, and the ability to get paid more.

It all sounded like a dream. Until it became my reality.

Don’t Call It A Comeback

Unlike most freelancers who quit their full-time job to pursue freelancing, I became a freelancer out of necessity.

Twice.

When your employer comes to you one day and says, “thank you but we no longer need your services.” What do you do?  For me, at the time, I did the only thing I knew how to do; I put my hard skills in SEO and online marketing to work as a consultant.

When it happened again this year, I did the same thing.

Only this time, I’m a little bit wiser.

I want to share what I know about the reality of being self-employed; what it really takes to build a consulting business from scratch. I also want to dispel the narrative on social media about freelancing which makes it look like you can be running your amazing, solopreneur business from your laptop on a beach in Bali.

My hope is to impart the reality of what you’re getting into if you’re considering following in the (sandy) footsteps of seemingly countless freelancers out there who are (at least visually) crushing it today. At the very least, I can share my wisdom to help you navigate this type of career path and the tools I’ve picked up along the way that will jumpstart your process.

In case you haven’t noticed the pattern in these Sponsored posts, the social media scene on Facebook and Instagram is rife with posts advertising how to become a lifestyle blogger /writer or digital nomad.  I’m not here to stomp all over your interests and passions, just don’t be fooled: there is no quick fix.

Here are three separate examples:

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It’s 2018, don’t be naive. There is no pill to take, no class to attend, no online workshop that can magically fast track you through the growth process of finding a profitable niche, building your brand, learning how to market yourself, and developing effective, repeatable methods for getting leads and prospecting clients.

The Perks of Freelancing

These perks live up to the hype:

  • zero commute
  • flexible working schedule
  • work from anywhere (that you can actually be productive)
  • being in control of what you make
  • no office politics
  • no need to spend money on expensive office wardrobe or (for ladies) makeup
  • no “all-hands” meetings (especially the impromptu kind)

That’s the plus side of what the freelance lifestyle affords you.

Yes, you have way more freedom and flexibility in your schedule to travel but, funding will invariably become a factor. If, for example, you plan to be jet setting around the world living that laptop lifestyle, you’d better be ready to be frugal with your finances and spend like a student on a semester abroad.
Yes, you are literally in charge of how much you can make. Every business needs to spend money to make money. But while full-time employees are reimbursed by their company, as someone who is self-employed, when you spend money, don’t expect a reimbursement check coming back to you in the mail.

No doubt the more glamorized version you see online makes it even more appealing. So, I thought it would be fun to paint a more realistic picture of the freelance life that I feel isn’t accurately being portrayed on social media.

Myth: You think working from home means taking it poolside.

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Reality: Have you ever been able to actually see your laptop screen in direct sunlight? Also, where do you plug in?

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Myth: You think being your own boss means you can spend the day as you please. Better yet, you’re such a boss you can multitask working on your laptop AND fit in gym time!

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Myth (con.t): You think building your brand online is tied to becoming Insta famous by posting selfies while crushing it and hashtagging: #bosslife #gymlife #laptopgamestrong #livingthedream.

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Reality check: who does this?!

Myth: You’ll think Wi-Fi everywhere and a Starbucks on every corner are you new BFF’s for productivity.

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Reality check: Public wi-fi is not the most secure. Plan on using coffee shops for breaks and writing not checking in on your client’s analytics data — you can’t know what someone would do if they happened to see your unsecured files on their device. The only friendly is the guy reading a newspaper!

Myth: Your freelance work from anywhere job means now you have the freedom and flexibility to jet set around the globe. Just you and your laptop!

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Reality check: Most of the jet-setting freelancers are single and have an on-the-go lifestyle anyway. It’s highly unlikely your spouse and/or kids’ schedules will allow them to also pick up and go. But, being able to dictate your own schedule does allow you to be available for your kids or work around a spouse’s tricky hours.

Myth: You’ll think after Googling “freelance writing jobs how to make money” and trying it out, you can make six figures in your first year.

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Reality check: this is the most dangerous association made about freelancing. Yes, freelance work is the type of job where you can create additional revenue streams. But it takes work, self discipline, processes and tools.

Remember when you were a little kid and you learned milk comes from cows and not the carton in the refrigerator? Becoming a freelancer is a lot like that.

The Benefits of Working From Home

Let me make a slight distinction between freelancing and working from home (WFH).

In this case, the former refers to being an entrepreneur where you market your skills and services, close business, fulfill projects, and repeat the cycle anew.  The latter could mean you have a particular set of skills that is conducive to operating out of your home (i.e. writer) and are employed full time with the ability to work remotely (i.e. from home).

Deciding to quit your day job and becoming a solopreneur because you want the benefits of a freelance lifestyle is inherently risky. If you don’t know what’s involved, there is a better way to dip your toe into the water.

There are certain types of jobs that afford you the ability to work from home. But there’s a big difference between being employed and getting to WFH and WFH as as a freelancer.

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Source: LinkedIn news stories feed, August 21, 2018

The key words in there are “if they’re in the right professions.”

If you simply want to work from home, here’s a helpful list of 50 Work-From-Home Jobs Paying as Much or a Lot More Than the Average American Salary by my friend and entrepreneur, John Rampton.

Similarly, he is someone who can attest to a handful of disadvantages of freelance work.  From my perspective, I’m documenting what I’m finding to be the realities of freelance life.

 

Freelance Reality

Anyone who tells you all about their glamorous lifestyle as a remote worker who freelances could use your unwavering stare as you await their honest answer.

It’s unfortunate that the corporate workplace gets painted as a cubicle prison, and freelance is the paradigm of freedom. A lifestyle with work-life balance that we all aspire to (I mean, it even has the word “free” built into the word).

 

The truth is anyone can freelance.  The reality is not everyone can thrive doing it.

You should never quit your full time day job if the income from your side hustle doesn’t cover your basic monthly expenses, and don’t forget about insurance and benifits. Re-read that sentence if you need to.

Now, I realize hearing that sucks because some people really are in crappy jobs and it’s just easier to quit and start your own thing. You can absolutely do that but take these two nuggets of wisdom before you leap:

  1. Use the time to build up your side hustle before you leave an existing income.
  2. Become really self aware of your strengths as a sole proprietor that contribute to growing your business and brand. And recognize what you should outsource.

For a while I thought my day job ate into the hours I could be spending investing in my side business. What I now realize is that you can always learn something from your exposure to any business. A day job in the industry you want to be in gives you context, contacts, and experience.

It’s easy to zone out and get comfortable at a 9-5. But what most people don’t realize about freelance work is that it will become your job to push yourself and motivate yourself and to time manage yourself accordingly.

Business doesn’t just come rolling in if you don’t know how to do outreach and identify and pitch prospects.

Projects don’t just get done if you don’t prioritize your time and do the work to deliver it on time.

And, fun fact: you’re the one responsible for making sure you get paid!

The reality, is you have to manage yourself.

When you work for someone else, you don’t have to think about or do all of the other things that come with running a business.

But, when you run the show, you must learn to discipline yourself in prioritizing your tasks and time.

What’s more, you must be frugal with your spending. Since month-to-month will be feast or famine, if you want to survive you’d better be a saver not a spender (somebody put that on a T-shirt!).

What you don’t hear freelancers talk about are things like:

  • Getting leads is an ongoing process and it’s largely about tapping into your network.
  • Becoming profitable means creating a sustainable referral-based business.
  • You’re going to have to figure out what to charge (hourly and project rates), and why.
  • You have to be able to clearly articulate what you do, what value you bring, what problem you solve and why someone should hire you.
  • If you market yourself online you’re going to want to set up a blog, landing page or website to capture leads and talk about your services.

3 Challenges of Being A Freelancer (and sources for overcoming them)

  1. Paying for healthcare out of pocket
  2. Paying taxes on your new income
  3. Making sure you have legal protection

Healthcare for self-employed: If you can get onto your spouse’s plan, it’s worth looking into. Otherwise, I learned about eHealth insurance that can provide plans for individuals or small businesses with at least one employee. The catch is that you have to wait for the open enrollment period (which begins in November).

Taxes: How much do I need to set aside? When should I pay taxes on freelance projects? The answer is, it depends. The best advice I can offer you is to get a tax guy (I’m happy to refer you to mine) who can accurately advise you on when and how much you’ll need to set aside for taxes. I’ve heard paying taxes on your freelance income quarterly is helpful.

Pro tip: Have a blank W2 form handy to be able to sign, scan and send to new clients so you can invoice them as an independent contractor.

Online business legalities: Whats the “legal side” of what you need to know about an online business? This is a seemingly daunting topic which I’ve been slowly reading up on. I came across a great resource by Christy Westerfeld. Start by reading her post on uncomplicating legal here.

 

5 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started Freelancing…

  1. Focusing on doing more of “the right things” daily that grow your business and prospects is invaluable. Specifically, spending two hours a day networking to build your pipeline. Also, set up systems to stay accountable doing things like attending networking events, creating content with an influencer, asking for a referral, and doing work that builds your portfolio.
  2. Be ruthless with scheduling and managing your time. This article on FastCompany (3 minute read) gave me perspective and new things to try, “How To Schedule Your Day For Peak Creative Performance.”
  3. Develop templates for repeatable paperwork like proposals, SOW’s (scope of work), invoices, etc.
  4. Organize your network in three groups: Prospects, Mentors, Peers.  Execute your outreach in that order.
  5. Don’t give up your gym membership. You’ll need an outlet and a supportive community to help you maintain perspective through the ups and downs of being your own boss.

 

Fantastic & Pactical Freelance Resources

Here’s who I wish I knew when starting out — and who I’m still learning from 😉

He’s one of the best out there for practical, actionable steps towards building a profitable side business. What’s more, Ryan is incredibly generous to others finding their way and has compiled and shared his best proposal templates for earning new business and converting leads into clients.

Pro tip: His podcast The Side Hustle Project: How to Start A Side Hustle Today is loaded with great interviews and information.

Credo connects businesses with vetted digital marketing providers. It’s ideal for companies that need SEO services and a lead resource for search engine optimization freelance professionals who want consistent work.

Due provides seamless payment solutions for businesses of all sizes. The site also has products and informative resources like a Consulting Guide and Freelancer Guide to help others get started.

If you’re not fired up and ready to attack the day after listening to Gary, I don’t know what else will do it for you. He talks entrepreneurship 24/7 — he even built his own search engine so you can get his thoughts and ideas on any topic.

Ideal for people who’ve spent hours trying to make their digital marketing business work but are out of ideas for closing business and getting more clients.

  • Christina Pashialis

A fellow freelance marketer based in the UK who shared her own powerfully honest learnings about freelance.

Last but definitely not least, Rand Fishkin. His book “Lost and Founder: A Painfully Honest Field Guide to the Startup World” is always within eyesight on my desk.

I’ll be sure to add more helpful resources here as I come across them 😀

Summary – Freelance jobs are the way of the future

Today, more than ever, jobs in the “professional services” industry are on the rise.

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Source: Mary Meeker – Internet Trends Report 2018

It’s not surprising since the nature of freelance work is largely equated to having a more flexible schedule and the ability to work from home. The data definitely reflects this.

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Source: Mary Meeker – Internet Trends Report 2018

 

It saddens me that freelance work isn’t a more viable option for more people. I believe it offers better flexibility for working parents. Especially those with the means to travel and take their children to see and experience new places. I believe there are people who are trustworthy and capable of working remotely who don’t need to be “visible” around the office in order to be productive. There are may positive aspects to freelance work but it’s important to understand that things like income and projects don’t just appear.

It’s all about executing on the right advice.

Execute on the right things for long enough, and you will be successful. These days, my definition of success as a freelancer is making an income that covers my rent and basic monthly expenses, making time for healthy meal prep along with daily fitness, and being home when my fiancé is also off work.

The dream of leading a freelance lifestyle – and IMHO, all of it’s inaccuracies – is still incredibly attractive to many people.  That being said, how you achieve financial success, grow your business, market your skills and services is where the real work will always need to be put in.

The dream is free. The hustle is sold separately.

 

San Francisco: What To Do If You Have One Day In The Bay

My college roommate visited me this weekend from Sacramento and we decided to play tourist around San Francisco for a day (despite her having been to the city many times, and me living less than 15 miles south of it).  There are so many sights to see around the bay area that I felt like there wasn’t enough time to visit them all let alone have an enjoyable catch up time.

What do you do with one day in the Bay?

I started my search by pulling out a bunch of printed brochures gathered from various visits by my mom and boyfriend’s mom (mom’s really are amazing!) and began sifting through an array of colorful, touristy options. Alcatraz tours, wine tasting, Pier 39 –it was hard to settle on one thing to see and do or balance what 2-3 sights we could realistically fit in. Way too much to choose from!

Then I came across a brochure for the Big Bus Tour a double-decker hop on/off sightseeing bus whose daytime route made several stops around the city. This allowed us to hit up a couple landmarks without driving around so we could actually spend the time sightseeing and talking. It was perfect.

We decided to meet at Embarcadero (stop # 5 on the route) which allowed us to get lunch in the area before linking up with the tour. We decided to try out The Slanted Door located inside the Ferry Building on the far north corner.  I was surprised to find this restaurant to be quite elegant, but comfortable and, at the same time, reasonably-priced. It had a unique menu with lots of tasty, adult beverages 😀

After getting a bite to eat, it was time to rendezvous at the bus pick up point. This proved to be a little difficult to locate at first since there wasn’t a lot of signage. But, their buses come around every 15-20 minutes so if you’re in the general area you can’t miss the Big Bus. If you’re curious about the day tour “red route” you can view it here.

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Personally, I always like to try to dress for the day’s activities. So, a couple quick tips about what to wear/bring when touring San Francisco in January. We happened to get a beautiful, clear day so rain ponchos were not needed but SF is known for its foggy weather so be sure to check the weather forecast once you book your tour.  It’s a safe bet to dress as though it were going to be under 40 degrees.

First, I have to tell you about the best pants to wear anytime you’re out and about sightseeing. Anything with a side stash pocket is perfect because you’re taking pictures one minute then getting up and moving to disembark the next. Being able to secure your phone in a pocket on your thigh instead of a backpack is much faster and seamless.  These types of pants are becoming a lot more popular by lifestyle athletic brands so wear whatever style you like (tights, jogger, capri) but, in my opinion, Athleta has the best street pants and at the best price. It’s one of my favorite brands.

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Wander Utility Pant by Athleta

I was wearing their Wander Utility Pant (sale price $75.99). These are fantastic pants to wear around the town because they’re more stylish than yoga pants and they function like cargo pants: they’re comfortable, chic and perfect for wearing around town.

Final note on what to wear and pack along. I took a set of gloves, scarf, baseball cap, sunglasses and jacket. The cap was really helpful when going across the Golden Gate bridge because it was so windy! This is going to sound really girly but it’s not enjoyable, or easy for that matter to take pictures, if your hair is whipping you in the face the whole way.

To recap, a hop on/hop off bus tour is a great way to kill a few birds with one stone. The only thing I would change is to have commemorative blankets available on the bus. Always be prepared and BYOB – Bring Your Own Blanket 😉

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Free Digital Marketing Advice: Why You Should Care About Search Engines

The short answer is, because search engines are the gateway to paying customers.

Aside from the glaring fact that 93% of online experiences begin with a search engine and there are over two billion people online (that’s roughly 40% of the world’s population). The reality is, a majority of your customer base is hanging out online.

More to the point, I’ll answer that question with another question. Have you ever gotten lost in the woods?

Now, if you haven’t, consider yourself lucky. But if you have, you know the only thing in the world you want (aside from a cheeseburger) is to be found.

Picture yourself alone in the woods. Completely alone and lost. When it happens, you start doing everything in your power to make sure someone finds you.

You put on any bright clothing you have.

You waive your arms and shout at anything that even remotely resembles a human being.

You start trying to build a fire to make smoke signals.

You pull out something reflective from your bag to flash at airplanes.

You start building large man-made structures (AKA ducks) to attract attention.

You locate the highest point possible or try to find open space so you can be spotted.

The point is, you fight to be found.

You fight because your very life depends on it.

But it’s only when you’re in that kind of extreme situation that you fight. You’re trying to get someone—anyone’s—attention.

Attention is currency. Especially online.

Now, instead of you alone in the woods picture that it’s your business or your blog that’s trying to be found online. Your one job as a listing on the first page is to grab someone’s attention, hook them on your story, and sell to them.

The search engine results page (SERP) is your wilderness.

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search for “what is content marketing.”  What would you click on?

The simple fact is that search engines process questions posed by real people (who have real money too!). Google processes over 3.5 billion searches every day.

It’s time to realize what it takes to be found online. And the fight is already at your doorstep. Between Google’s Mobile First index initiative and smart, connected devices everywhere, getting found is only the beginning of surviving in the digital age.

The Secret to Great Content Marketing: Q&A with Scott Stratten

The more things change, the more they stay the same.

That’s never been more true for content marketers than it is today. Thankfully, there are unconventional marketers living and speaking (read: ranting) among us to guide the way and keep us honest about what really matters in business and to people. Scott Stratten is one of them.  Scott is the author of “UnMarketing: Everything Has Changed and Nothing is Different.” He is also a dynamic speaker.

I first heard of Scott and his work when I was interviewing a number of speakers from Content Marketing World earlier this year.  I was curious to get his perspective on how he consistently creates quality content. While I wasn’t able to meet Scott in person, he very kindly responded to my interview questions via email.

His answers delighted and informed me. I hope you enjoy his wit and wisdom too:

(HM) What information does your audience most want to read about? And how do you deliver on that?

(SS) We’re pretty unique in that we focus mainly on bad business instead of good. The UnPodcast is “The Business Show For The Fed-Up”. We’ve become the magnet for when a brand does wrong, our army of followers send it to us. You never want to be the name in the message “Did you guys see this?”

We deliver it through our weekly UnPodcast, blog (rarely), 5 books and 60 keynote talks at conferences per year.

(HM) How do you know what to write about? 

(SS) If we find it interesting, then so does our audience. We’ve always put out content we enjoyed, and then the audience qualifies itself.

(HM) How do you say current with industry trends in content marketing?

(SS) Always be consuming. To be a good content marketer, you have to be an insatiable content consumer. I never stop reading/watching/listening. That’s my only job. Strong newsletter subscriptions, Google news alerts and even smarter friends/colleagues/fans that curate great content, both directly to us and in their own feeds.

(HM) What combination of platforms are you using to curate and create content?

(SS) Weekly UnPodcast, blog, 5 books and 60 keynote talks at conferences per year. Post weekly on UnMarketing Facebook page (on average, no set frequency), tweet when we feel like it and wonder weekly why we use LinkedIn.

(HM) What are some of the problems that aren’t being addressed by larger companies in the area of content marketing?

(SS) Content is contextual based on the platform it’s published on. We uploaded a video of one of my rants. It got 250k views, which is great but should have been better. Knowing the context of Facebook video (versus YouTube) that you have to catch a potential viewer in a scroll on their news feeds, we re-uploaded the same clip, with a letterboxed view, complete with an attention grabbing headline that stayed on the video. It received over 14,000,000 views. No changes except the words on it.

(HM) What’s a common question you get asked a lot from your clients relating to content?

(SS) No idea, we have no clients 🙂

(HM) In your opinion, what is the most important element of storytelling?

(SS) There’s a reason most great stories are from humans instead of brands: companies can’t get themselves away from the mirror and realize it’s about the person consuming the story, not the one telling it.

(HM) What is your biggest content related challenge?

(SS) The debate between frequency and quality. We send a newsletter out every 6 months, but we should do it a lot more.

(HM) What does your research process look like when you’re writing about a topic you don’t know anything about?

(SS) Google 🙂

(HM) How do you see content evolving over the next 3-5 years?

(SS) Not much. Most people are predicting we’ll consume everything in VR/AR have a vested interested in it.

Bio

Scott Stratten is the President of UnMarketing. He is an expert in Viral, Social, and Authentic Marketing which he calls UnMarketing. Formerly a music industry marketer, national sales training manager and a Professor at the Sheridan College School of Business, he ran his “UnAgency” for a nearly a decade before solely focusing on speaking at events for companies like PepsiCo, Adobe, Red Cross, Hard Rock Cafe, Cirque du Soleil, Saks Fifth Avenue, Deloitte and Fidelity Investments when they need help guiding their way through the viral/social media and relationship marketing landscape. He now has over 175,000 people follow his daily rantings on Twitter and was named one of the top 5 social media influencers in the world on Forbes.com.

He has written four best-selling business books, the newest being “UnSelling: The New Customer Experience” which was just named “Sales Book of the Year” by 1-800 CEOREAD.

His passion comes out most when speaking on stage, preaching engagement and becoming one of the most sought-out speakers on the subject. Along with Alison Kramer, their UnPodcast has been signed by the CBS network as their premier business podcast to launch their new digital network.

His clients’ viral marketing videos have been viewed over 60 million times and he’s recently appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Huffington Post, USA Today, Entrepreneur Magazine, CNN.com, Inc.com and Fast Company and was named one of “America’s 10 Marketing Gurus” by Business Review USA. That plus $5 gets him a coffee anywhere in the world.


Follow UnMarketing on Facebook  or on Twitter at @unmarketing.